Office of the executive mayor of Emalahleni launches 16 Days of Activism

Officials from other departments together with the office of the executive mayor of eMalahleni led by Ms Trudy Xhala-Mavimbela, manager of the Transversal Services Unit, at the Transnet overhead bridge. This was during the launch of the 16 days of Activism on No Violence against women and children and World AIDS Day with other stakeholders talking to substance users.

The Office of the Executive Mayor of Emalahleni, through the Transversal Services Unit launched the 16 days of Activism on No Violence against women and children and World AIDS Day.

According to a report from the office of the executive mayor through the Transversal Unit under Ms Trudy Xhala-Mavimbela, it was reported that eMalahleni has shown an alarming rise in the number of victims of rape, family violence, murder of children and trafficking of women and children.

The number includes people living with disability.

Poverty and other ills are reported as contributing factors.

Stakeholder’s partners with the office of the executive mayor of eMalahleni during the launch of Violence against women and children and World AIDS Day at Klarinet on Monday, November 27.

“Emalahleni municipality will take part in this national event. We have partnered with local stakeholders to host programmes that will run throughout eMalahleni in these crucial months of November to December. Different stakeholders were invited to take part and mobilize community members to be part of all programmes for 16 Days of Activism on No violence Against Women and Children and World AIDS Day. The programme started on Monday, November 27 and will run until Tuesday, December 12,” reads a statement from the office of the executive mayor.

On Monday, substance abuser hotspots around the city were visited and users were asked about challenges they faced in their daily lives.

At the Transnet overhead bridge, they raised different issues and most of them indicated that they want to quit but they find it very difficult as they need support.

“We all want to quit, but we need to do something to keep us busy like work. If work opportunities can be arranged for us we can quit. Some of us were raised by single parents, our mothers. We need that father figure in our lives. Sanca need to do something about their programmes so that they can suite us. Poverty led some of us to get involved in drugs. Most people just criticise us without knowing how difficult our lives are. Some of us have been to the rehab but we came back to the same situation and that lead us to go back to drugs,” said some of the users.

A silent protest, part of the 16 days of Activism on No Violence against women and children and World AIDS Day, was held at the Lynnville Four-Way stop on Monday, November 27.

Transversal Unit, Sanca, SAPS, Department of Social Development, Eyasa were some of the stakeholders represented during the visits.

Late in the afternoon a silent protest was also held at the 4-Way Stop in Lynnville.

  AUTHOR
Solly Maseko
JOURNALIST/PHOTOGRAPHER

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